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How to become self employed

How to fund your care

How to become self employed

We are here to help, all it takes is a few easy steps, it’s that simple.

INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION TO HMRC – Personal tax accounts – HMRC’s online service for individuals

How to Register with Government Gateway in the UK?

Online security

HOW TO BECOME SELF-EMPLOYED

Earn first, then register!!!

I’m registering my business – which structure should I choose?

How to become self employed in the UK

Registering for Self Assessment

My first Self Assessment tax return

How do I tailor my Self Assessment tax return?

What expenses can I include in my Self Assessment tax return?

Claiming motoring expenses if you’re self-employed

Class 2 National Insurance contributions and your Self Assessment tax return

Do I need to register my business for VAT?

How to Submit your VAT Return Online

Check your state pension on GOV.UK

How to fund your care

We have put together a guide for funding to make it easier for you to find the best way to fund your care needs. Our simple guide aims to take the stress out of arranging payment for care.

*This information is based on Social care and support guide:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/

These rates are applicable until April 2021.

Support based on your income

Local Authority Funding

If your total savings drop beneath £23,250, your local authority (council) is able to support your care.

If your income is between £14,250 and £23,250 then the local council will fund some of your care and you’ll contribute to the rest.

If your income is less than £14,250 then the local council will pay for your care.

If your care is over £23,250 then you must pay full fees.

Here are the steps for you to arrange council funding if your income is below £23,250:

The first step to is to arrange a Needs Assessment, through which the council will check how much help you need.

A needs assessment can tell you what type of assistance you should be requesting.

The needs assessment is free and can be taken by anyone.

Apply for a Needs Assessment here:

https://www.gov.uk/apply-needs-assessment-social-services

Once you have filled in the needs assessment, you will go on to complete a financial assessment, whereby the council will determine if you are eligible to receive full support or part funding. Meaning:

-the council pays the full cost of your care

-the council will pay for some of the costs

-you pay for all of your care

For more information about a financial assessment click here:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/help-from-social-services-and-charities/financial-assessment-means-test/

Post the assessments, you will receive a care and support plan. Please find more information here:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/help-from-social-services-and-charities/care-and-support-plans/

The personal budget will be paid in any of the 3 ways:

-a direct payment into your bank account to pay for the care – the council will ask you to provide supporting receipts

-the council arranges and pays for your care

-a mix of the above, whereby the council arranges some care and pay for the care.

For more information, you can contact the Disability Rights UK Helpline on 0330 995 0404.

Support not based on your income

NHS continuing healthcare

Some people with long-term complex health needs can receive free social care arranged by the NHS. To eligible for NHS continuing healthcare, you will be assessed by a healthcare professional team.

An NHS organisation that commissions local health services must assess whether you are eligible. You will fill an initial checklist assessment which is used to decide if you need a full assessment. Speak to your doctor or social worker if you think you might be eligible for NHS continuing healthcare.

Refer to more information in the below video:

Refer to more information here:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/money-work-and-benefits/nhs-continuing-healthcare/

Other benefits for under 65s

1. Personal independence Payment (PIP)

PIP is for people between 16 and 64 who need help at home because of an illness or disability.

  • You can get a standard payment of £57.30 per week or £85.60 per week if you are more seriously ill.
  • You can also get an extra £22.65 per week for a standard mobility payment and an extra £59.75 per week (enhanced mobility payment).

You can claim these benefits no matter how much you have in your savings.

You can request your claim form by telephone, text or by post – see the following link for details:

https://www.gov.uk/pip/how-to-claim

Once you have your form, you can find more details on providing information to support your claim here:

2. Disability Premium

Disability Premium is an extra amount added to some benefits. You can get at least £33.55 a week if you are single or at least £47.80 a week if you’re a couple.

Who can get this:

You can get this if you are under pension age, you are registered blind or you get PIP. Refer to more information here:

https://www.gov.uk/disability-premiums

3. Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

This is a payment of up to £174.80 a week.

Who can get this:

You can get this if you’re disabled because of an accident at work, or you have an illness that was caused by work.

You can download and print a claim form or request a claim form by phone. Refer to more information here:

https://www.gov.uk/industrial-injuries-disablement-benefit

4. Employment and Support Allowance

You could receive up to £73.10 a week if you’re assessed as able to work in future and up to £110.75 a week if you’re assessed as unable to work again.

Who can get this:

You can get it if a disability or illness makes it hard for you to work and you have savings of less than £16,000.

However, you cannot if you are getting Jobseeker’s Allowance, Income Support or Universal Credit. Refer to more information here:

https://www.gov.uk/employment-support-allowance

5. Reduced Earnings Allowance

You could receive a payment of up to £67.88 a week.

Who can get this:

You can work but you can’t earn as much as before, because of an accident or illness caused by work.

Refer to more information here:

https://www.gov.uk/reduced-earnings-allowance

Other benefits

If you get PIP and you work, you might also be able to get the disability element of Working Tax Credit (up to £4,420 a year, depending on how severe your disability is).

Call the tax credits helpline on 0345 300 3900.

Check what benefits you can get here:

https://www.entitledto.co.uk/benefits-calculator/Intro/Home?cid=74676abc-46b0-4e5c-bc2d-aadfb4428e23

Get more help and advice here:

Other benefits for over 65s

1. Attendance Allowance

This is for people who need help with personal care or supervision because of illness or disability. This is usually paid every 4 weeks and can be used in any way to meet your needs, including to stay independent in your home.

You can receive a lower rate of £59.70 (if you need help during the day or night) or higher rate of £89.15 (if you need help during the day and at night or you’re terminally ill).

This is not based on the income you already receive, and it is tax-free. Refer to more information here:

https://www.gov.uk/attendance-allowance

2. Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

This is a payment of up to £174.80 a week.

Who can get this:

You can get this if you’re disabled because of an accident at work, or you have an illness that was caused by work.

You can download and print a claim form or request a claim form by phone. Refer to more information here:

https://www.gov.uk/industrial-injuries-disablement-benefit

3. Constant Attendance Allowance

A payment for people who are ill or disabled because of specific circumstances. Payment range from £34.95 to £139.80 a week.

However, you cannot claim this if you are already claiming Attendance Allowance.

https://www.gov.uk/constant-attendance-allowance

4. Pension Credit

People over State Pension age can benefit from Pension Credit. It can top up your income if you are struggling to make ends meet – if your income is below £173.75 (for a single person) or £256.20 (for couples). You may also be eligible for an extra payment for people if they have reached State Pension age on or after 6 April 2016.

You can use the Pension Credit calculator to how much you might get.

https://www.gov.uk/pension-credit-calculator

You may also be eligible for other benefits – use the links below to determine the full list of benefits you maybe entitled to.

  • Policy in Practice – for information on income-related benefits, tax credits, contribution-based benefits, Council Tax Reduction, Carer’s Allowance, Universal Credit, how these are calculated and how your benefits will be affected if you start work or change your working hours
  • entitledto – for information on income-related benefits, tax credits, contribution-based benefits, Council Tax Reduction, Carer’s Allowance, Universal Credit and how your benefits will be affected if you start work
  • Turn2us – for information on income-related benefits, tax credits, Council Tax Reduction, Carer’s Allowance, Universal Credit and how your benefits will be affected if you start work or change your working hours

Care and support you can get for free

There is help and support you can get for free, regardless of your income. This includes the following:

1. Free equipment and home adaptations

You may be entitled to free equipment and home adaptations that cost less than £1,000. The council can undertake a home assessment to check if you need a change to your home or a piece of equipment. You can apply for a home assessment here:

https://www.gov.uk/apply-home-equipment-for-disabled

2. Helping after coming home from hospital (reablement)

You may be eligible for free care at home for up to 6 weeks after a stay in hospital or to prevent going into hospital. This can include live in care, equipment or home adaptations. You can arrange free care as follows:

-Speak to hospital staff when you are about to leave the hospital to arrange your care.

-Speak to social services if you have been discharged and care hasn’t been arranged.

-Speak to your GP if you have fallen or if you need help because you are ill.

If you are not eligible or would like to arrange your own care

Self Funding

You may not be entitled to help with the cost of care if you have savings worth more than £23,250.

You can ask your financial assessment to check if you qualify for any help with costs: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/social-care-and-support-guide/help-from-social-services-and-charities/financial-assessment-means-test/

Equity

Equity release allows your loved one to access the equity (cash) tied up in your home if you are over the age of 55. You can take the money you release as a lump sum or in smaller amounts. This enables you to use the additional funds to pay for your care fees, without having to move out of your home. However, you have to pay interest on the money you take out. For more information, check the Money Advice Service.

https://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/en/articles/equity-release

You can speak to someone for advice and help from:

-Age UK on freephone 0800 169 6565

-Independent Age on freephone 0800 319 6789

-The Money Advice Service on freephone 0800 138 7777

Citizens Advice. Call 03444 111 444